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The technology to reach net-zero carbon emissions isn’t ready for prime time, but…

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1629999372609{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}"]It’s already under development in research labs.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1629999391926{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}"]August 25, 2021[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1629999462620{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}"]By Daniel T. Schwartz | Originally published in Scientific American[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1629999477119{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}"]U.S. climate envoy John Kerry recently stated that in order to reach net zero emission goals by 2045, we’ll “need technologies we don’t yet have.” Well, he’s half right. It’s true that battling climate change requires innovative, technologically driven ideas that can be tested, replicated and scaled, at warp speed. But inventing wholly new technology isn’t necessarily the answer, nor is the idea we can deploy today's technology all the way to 100 percent clean energy.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1629999489451{padding-bottom:...