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Justin Pothoof

Justin Pothoof

The role of ion migration and its effects on device operation is well studied in 3D perovskite materials. Contrarily, ion migration is unexplored in 2D and quasi-2D perovskites. 2D perovskites are on the forefront of clean energy research because of their increased moisture stability, a result of incorporating a bulky hydrophobic cation, and easily tunable bandgap. Utilizing scanning kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) will allow the direct observation of charges moving throughout the device under operation. Photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM) will generate a map of the chemical environment under operation, showing how the material chemically changes under a bias. Experimental variables such as the bulky cation, light intensity, and bias intensity can easily be changed to observe the effect on ion mobility. Understanding the mechanism and role of ion migration in 2D perovskite will allow scientists to fabricate record-setting solar cells and LEDs.

Advisor: David Ginger – Chemistry

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