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Daniel Tabas

Daniel Tabas

As inverter-interfaced energy sources like wind and solar power replace conventional generators, the grid will see both an increase in the variability of net demand and a decline in the system’s mechanical inertia. This simultaneous rise in variability and drop in inertia poses problems for the transient stability of the grid. However, the flexibility of inverter-interfaced devices can be leveraged to bolster the system’s reliability. My research aims to develop a robust control framework for improving transient stability margins in low-inertia grids, in order to safely accommodate more renewable energy. Specifically, we will examine ways in which power injections from an energy storage device can be controlled to best mitigate electromechanical transients in the power system. The project will investigate different approaches to robust design including methods rooted in differential game theory, convex optimization, and H-infinity control. We will compare each method for performance and tractability.

Advisor: Baosen Zhang — Electrical & Computer Engineering

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